Omaha Folklore Project: Interview with Daniel R. Gruenig

The oral history interview of Daniel R. Gruenig was conducted by UNO student Barbara Gruenig on December 5, 1976. Gruenig was an Omaha, Nebraska resident all of his life. He talked about the city of Omaha during the Great Depression. He shared the story of how his parents came to meet in Omaha when the city was young and rapidly expanding. He also talked about his memories of the layout of the city of Omaha, including the growth and changing technology for transportation in the city. He also shared memories of the Omaha tornado of March 1913 and the attempted hanging of white Omaha Mayor Edward Parsons Smith during the September 1919 Omaha race riot that resulted in the mob lynching of African American worker Will Brown., UNO Libraries' Archives & Special Collections, 00:27:57
View this Object: http://library.unomaha.edu/_audio/MSS0018_au033.html
Abstract/Description: The oral history interview of Daniel R. Gruenig was conducted by UNO student Barbara Gruenig on December 5, 1976. Gruenig was an Omaha, Nebraska resident all of his life. He talked about the city of Omaha during the Great Depression. He shared the story of how his parents came to meet in Omaha when the city was young and rapidly expanding. He also talked about his memories of the layout of the city of Omaha, including the growth and changing technology for transportation in the city. He also shared memories of the Omaha tornado of March 1913 and the attempted hanging of white Omaha Mayor Edward Parsons Smith during the September 1919 Omaha race riot that resulted in the mob lynching of African American worker Will Brown.
Subject(s): Audiocassettes
Oral histories (document genres)
Omaha (Neb.) -- History
History
Depressions -- 1929
Date Created: 1976-12-05

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